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July 8, 2015

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Exploring the Fontaine de Belleville

by soundlandscapes

AS WELL AS BEING a plein-air gallery of street art, the pavilion at the top of the Parc de Belleville also affords a panoramic view across Paris.

Parc de Belleville

While the Parc de Belleville vies with Montmartre for the distinction of being the highest point in Paris, the Parc de Belleville is unchallenged as the highest park in the city and the view from the top is quite spectacular.

Parc de Belleville

Designed by the architect, François Debulois, and the landscaper, Paul Brichet, the Parc de Belleville covers 45,000 square meters of hillside in the 20th arrondissement stretching from rue Piat in the northeast to rue Julien-Lacroix in the southwest. It was opened to the public in December 1988.

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In medieval times the fertile land and natural springs on this hillside were perfect for cultivating grapes and so vineyards appeared. From the fourteenth century onwards, taverns and guinguettes also began to proliferate. Guinguettes were drinking establishments that also served as restaurants and dance halls. Up until the mid nineteenth century Belleville was outside the Paris city limits and was exempt from the tax on alcohol so the taverns and guinguettes offering cheap drink were hugely popular.

In the mid nineteenth century a gypsum quarry was carved out of the hillside and that attracted a population of seasonal workers who worked on Baron Haussmann’s Parisian construction projects during the winter and returned home in the summer to tend their fields. Itinerant workers together with cheap drink didn’t exactly enhance the reputation of the hillside and the area was dubbed ‘insalubrious’.

In the nineteenth century this hillside was also known for the grand party organised each year for Mardi Gras. On the last day of the Mardi Gras celebrations huge crowds came to witness the ‘Descente de la Courtille’, named after the cheap taverns and restaurants that lined the rue de Belleville.

Parc de Belleville

The Open-Air Theatre

Today, the Parc de Belleville has a small museum, the Maison de l’Air, designed to highlight the importance of fresh air and the problems of pollution. There is also a wooden playground for children and an open-air theatre all set against a background of some 1,200 trees and shrubs and 1,000 m² of lawn.

Parc de Belleville

A feature of the Parc de Belleville that makes full use of the sloping hillside is the Fontaine de Belleville. The name is perhaps a little misleading because it’s really a water cascade rather than a traditional fountain. It falls for 100 metres down the hillside making it the longest water feature in Paris.

I went to the Fontaine de Belleville to explore the different sound textures as the water falls from the top of the park to the bottom. Although I’ve been to the Parc de Belleville many times I’ve never managed to be there when the entire water cascade has been working … and this visit was no exception. Some stretches were inexplicably dry and others were subject to construction work but I was nevertheless able to explore most of the cascade.

Parc de Belleville

Sounds of the Fontaine de Belleville:

Parc de Belleville

At the top of the park the cascade begins its descent in two parallel streams separated by a walkway. Each stream falls over two flights of steps into a pool at the bottom. I began recording the sounds at the foot of the pool where excess water was overflowing into a drain. Presently a little girl appeared and, bedecked in her summer dress, she jumped into the pool with a splash. This was obviously fun because she kept on doing it completely oblivious to my microphones.

Parc de Belleville

Moving on, I passed part of the cascade nestling in the pavé and then I came upon more steps where the cascade again splits into two. I stopped to record the water trickling over the steps on one side.

Parc de Belleville

I found these sounds particularly interesting. First, the sonic texture of the water seemed to be gentler and better defined at this point than it was further up the hill. Second, the speed of the water varied which changed the sonic profile. And third, there was a curious sound in the background which sounded a little like the rumble of thunder. On this particularly hot summer’s day I can confirm that it wasn’t thunder but rather the rumble of the water emerging from the previous section of the cascade from a hole at the back of the top step in what seemed like a procession of large bubbles. As each bubble burst the flow of water increased. I found this absolutely fascinating to listen to.

Parc de Belleville

Moving on again, I became aware that this water cascade does not operate entirely thanks to gravity, it requires assistance. At the end of the pavé circle is a pool where the sounds of water compete with the mechanical sounds of the pumping system.

Parc de Belleville

I recorded sounds from the edge of the pool where the sonic texture of the water changed to more of a hiss competing with the sounds of the pumping system and where the sound of occasional birdsong provided a welcome counterpoint.

Parc de Belleville

I ventured down some steps to stand underneath the pool where I found the sounds of the water falling over the edge neatly relegated the sounds of the pumping system back into second place. The pumping system is required not only to assist the flow of water down the hillside but also to pump it back up to the top again. It follows therefore that the mechanical sounds of the pumping system are as much a part of the sound tapestry of the cascade as the sounds of the water itself.

Parc de Belleville

This graffiti covered section of the cascade did not carry water so I could only imagine what it might sound like if it was in full flow.

Below this point a large section of the cascade was being renovated so it too was out of action, which was rather a shame because it’s the part of the cascade that usually attracts most visitors especially on a hot summer’s day. But all was not lost; this section at the bottom of the cascade leading to rue Julien-Lacroix at least was still open.

Parc de Belleville

I found exploring the Fontaine de Belleville and listening carefully to its sounds a fascinating way to spend a morning.

Listening to the little girl splashing in the pool at the top and the children at the bottom doing much the same I was reminded of a line from the poem by Richard Wilbur, A Baroque Wall-Fountain in the Villa Sciarra;

Happy in all that ragged, loose collapse of water, its effortless descent and flatteries of spray…”

Parc de Belleville

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3 Comments Post a comment
  1. hmunro
    Jul 9 2015

    I recognize some of these spots from that wonderful walk we had last November, Des — but the sounds are entirely foreign, because of course the fountain wasn’t running then. How wonderful to experience the familiar through such an unfamiliar perspective! Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jul 9 2015

      Thank you, Heather.

      Yes, I had you very much in mind as I stood on the belvedere looking at the magnificent view over Paris. I’m sorry that you didn’t get to see the Fontaine de Belleville in action – that’s the downside of visiting in November – although I hope our Edith Piaf ‘bookend’ walk (with the Campagne à Paris coda) compensated for it.

      I do though recall that standing on the belvedere we had a fascinating conversation about the Parisian skyline. I also remember that I told you that the day before we met the Paris City Council had rejected the proposal to build the all-glass ‘Tour Triangle’ skyscraper out at Porte de Versailles. Well, I can now report that, despite your letter to the Mayor of Paris, she has had that decision overturned and the ‘Tour Triangle’ will now go ahead.

      In other news – after my visit to the Parc de Belleville I walked down to rue Dénoyez, the plein-air street art gallery that you enjoyed so much, where I discovered that the destruction has not yet begun and all the walls were still as colourful as you will remember them.

      Reply
      • hmunro
        Jul 10 2015

        Our November walk didn’t need to compensate for anything, Des, because it was *perfect.* (I still intend to post something about that lovely afternoon — hopefully before I depart for my next trip!)

        And thank you for the update about the Paris skyline. I’d heard the sad news about the Tour Triangle from a friend who has been extremely active in fighting it. What a pity — though at least you have positive news to pass on about the rue Dénoyez. May her inhabitants prevail!

        I’d better stop writing now, because I’m starting to get well and fully nostalgic for Paris. Sigh.

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